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Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems

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Author: Xu Yuanchong;
Language: Chinese, English
Page: 336
Publication Date: 09/2018
ISBN: 9787508540276
Details
Ancient Chinese classic poems are exquisite works of art. As far as 2,000 years ago, Chinese poets composed the beautiful work Book of Poetry and Elegies of the South, Later, they created more splendid Tang poetry and Song lyrics. Such classic works as Thus Spoke the Master and Laws: Divine and Human were extremely significant in building and shaping the culture of the Chinese nation. These works are both a cultural bond linking the thoughts and affections of Chinese people and an important bridge for Chinese culture and the world. Mr. Xu Yuanchong has been engaged in translation for 70 years. In December 2010, he won the Lifetime Achievement Award in Translation conferred by the Translators Association of China (TAC). He is honored as the only expert who translates Chinese poems into both English and French. After his excellent interpretation, many Chinese classic poems have been further refined into perfect English and French rhymes. This collection of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose gathers his most representative English translations. It includes the classic works Thus Spoke the Master, Laws: Divine and Human and dramas such as Romance of the Western Bower, Dream in Peony Pavilion, Love in Long-life Hall and Peach Blossom Painted with Blood. The largest part of the collection includes the translation of selected poems from different dynasties. The selection includes various types of poems, lyrics and Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasty songs. The selected works start from the pre-Qin era to the Qing Dynasty, covering almost the entire history of classic poems in China. Reading these works is like tasting "living water from the source" of Chinese culture. We hope this collection will help English readers "know, love and appreciate" Chinese classic poems, share the intelligence of Confucius and Lao Tzu, share the gracefulness of Tang Dynasty poems, Song lyrics and classic operas and songs and promote exchanges between Eastern and Western culture. This book is one of the 14 books of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose, a translation of Confucian classics Thus Spoke the Master.
 
Table of Contents
Contents
目 录
Preface
Yu Shinan
To the Cicada
To the Firefly
Kong Shao’an
Falling Leaves
Wang Ji
The Wineshop
A Field View
Han Shan
Long, Long the Pathway to Cold Hill
Shangguan Yi
Early Spring in Laurel Palace
Wang Bo
Farewell to Prefect Du
Prince Teng’s Pavilion
Yang Jiong
I would Rather Fight
Luo Binwang
The Cicada Heard in Prison
Wei Chengqing
Parting with my Younger Brother
Song Zhiwen
Crossing River Han
Shen Quanqi
The Garrison at Yellow Dragon Town
He Zhizhang
The Willow
Home-coming
Chen Zi’ang
On the Tower at Youzhou
Parting Gift

虞世南

咏萤
孔绍安
落叶
王绩
过酒家
野望
寒山
杳杳寒山道
上官仪
早春桂林殿应诏
王勃
送杜少府之任蜀州
滕王阁诗
杨炯
从军行
骆宾王
在狱咏蝉
韦承庆
南行别弟
宋之问
渡汉江
沈佺期
杂诗
贺知章
咏柳
回乡偶书二首
陈子昂
登幽州台歌
送东莱王学士无竞 
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Sample pages of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems (ISBN:9787508540276) Sample pages of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems (ISBN:9787508540276) Sample pages of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems (ISBN:9787508540276) Sample pages of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems (ISBN:9787508540276) Sample pages of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems (ISBN:9787508540276) Sample pages of Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems (ISBN:9787508540276)
 

Du Xunhe
A WIDOW LIVING IN THE MOUNTAINS
Her husband killed in war, she lives in a thatched hut,
Wearing coarse hemper clothes and a flaxen hair.
She should pay taxes though down mulberries were cut,
And before harvest though fields and gardens lie bare.
She has to eat wild herbs together with their root,
And burn as fuel leafy branches from the trees.
However deep she hides in mountains as a brute,
From oppressive taxes she can never be free.
杜荀鹤
山中寡妇
夫因兵死守蓬茅,麻苎衣衫鬓发焦。
桑柘废来犹纳税,田园荒后尚征苗。
时挑野菜和根煮,旋斫生柴带叶烧。
任是深山更深处,也应无计避征徭。
Huang Chao
TO THE CHRYSANTHEMUM
In soughing western wind you blossom far and nigh;
Your fragrance is too cold to invite butterfly.
Some day if I as Lord of Spring come into power,
I’d order you to bloom together with peach flower.
THE CHRYSANTHEMUM
When autumn comes, the mountain-climbing day is nigh;
My flower blows when other blooms come to an end.
In battle array my fragrance rises sky-high;
The capital with my golden armour will blend.
黄巢
题菊花
飒飒西风满院栽,蕊寒香冷蝶难来。
他年我若为青帝,报与桃花一处开。
菊花
待到秋来九月八,我花开后百花杀。
冲天香阵透长安,满城尽带黄金甲。
Wang Jia
A SPRING FEAST
The paddy crops wax rich at the foot of Goose-lake Hill;
Door half closed, pigs in sty and fowls in cage are still.
The shade of mulberries lengthens, the feast is o’er,
All drunken villagers are helped back to their door.
AFTER THE RAIN
Before the rain I still see blooming flowers;
Only green leaves are left after the showers.
Over the wall pass butterflies and bees;
I wonder if spring’s in my neighbor’s trees.
王驾
社日
鹅湖山下稻粱肥,豚栅鸡栖半掩扉。
桑柘影斜春社散,家家扶得醉人归。
王驾
雨晴
雨前初见花间蕊,雨后全无叶底花。
蜂蝶纷纷过墙去,却疑春色在邻家。



Preface

Preface
It is said that the 21st century will be an age of globalization. The new generation worthy of the new age should be bred not only in its national culture but also in the global culture. Therefore, each nation should try to globalize its culture, in other words, to make its culture known to the world and become a part of the global culture so as to make it more brilliant.
If the 20th century may be said to be an American age, then the 19th was a British age and the 18th a French one. If we go further back, we may say that the 7th–13th centuries were Chinese ages, for during the Tang and the Song dynasties (618– 1279), China was the most advanced country in the world, so far as political system, economic development and artistic and literary culture are concerned.
How did the Tang and the Song attain the highest development in the world during six hundred years? The answer may be summed up in two words, that is, the reign of “rite and music.” According to professon Y. L. Feng, music imitates the harmony of nature and rite imitates the order of the universe. Rite is instituted to secure the mean in man’s desire, and music, including poetry, to secure the mean in man’s sentiment. Music is benevolence concretized and rite is justice externalized. If a state is governed with rite and music, its people will be just and benevolent, and the world will be peaceful and happy. That is one of the reasons why China has been standing among the great nations for thousands of years.
Emperor Xuan Zong (685–762) who reigned at the zenith of the Tang Dynasty enjoyed the highest economic and cultural prosperity when his government promoted the performance of rite and music. This may be seen from the first two verses he wrote when he offered sacrifice to Confucius in his temple:
How much have you done, O, my sage,
All for the good of all the age!
This shows how much he worshipped Confucius and admired his wisdom. He followed Confucius in imitation of the order of the universe and provided conditions to make the performance of rite and music possible.
Hence, Tang poetry has become a gem of traditional Chinese literature, As early as 1898, Herbert A Giles published his rhymed translations of Tang poems, of which Lytton Stratchey said, “the poetry is it is the best that this generation has known,” and that it “holds a unique place in the literature of the world” “through its mastery of the tones and depths of affection.” Later, Arthur Waley said in his translations from the Chinese, “If one uses thyme, it is impossible not to sacrifice sense to sound,” and he translated Tang poems into free verse. Thus began the controversy between rhymed version and free version in the translation of Chinese poetry. Generally speaking, the free translation emphasizes faithfulness to the original while the rhymed version, the beauty of the translated verse. Therefore, the controversy between these two types of translation may be said to be contradiction or conflict between faithfulness or truth and beauty. This controversy has lasted for a century. For instance, we may read the following versions of Li Bai’s Farewell to a Friend. The first version is a word for word transliteration, the second is more faithful to the original in word while the third is more beautiful and poetical than the second.
 

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Classical Chinese Poetry and Prose: 300 Tang Poems
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