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Chinese Idioms and Their Stories (Illustrated Version)

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Author: Zhang Ciyun;
Language: English
Format: 21 x 13.8 x 2 cm
Page: 298
Publication Date: 07/2015
ISBN: 9787532768899
Details
About the Author
Born in Shanghai in 1949, ZHANG Ciyun (Peter) graduated from Jilin Normal University, PRC with a major in English and later from Stanford University in the United States with a Master's Degree in Journalism. Since 1980, he has worked for several newspapers and magazines in both Beijing and Shanghai. Also, he once served in the General Office of the Ministry of Communications as an interpreter and the Information Office of Shanghai Municipality as its Deputy General Director. An acclaimed translator, reporter and editor,
Mr.Zhang has helped bring into existence four English-language newspapers on the Chinese mainland,namely, China Daily, Beijing Weekend, Shanghai Star and Shanghai Daily. He is now the Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Shanghai Daily and an executive council member of Translation Association of China.He has translated and co-translated more than a dozen books and a large amount of documents, includingStrange Stories of Liao Zhai Studio and the English version of the Basic Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. He has also published many English and Chinese articles and theses in newspapers and magazines both in China and overseas.
Table of Contents
按图索骥
百步穿杨
班门弄斧
别开生面
兵不厌诈
博士买驴
跛鳖千里
沧海桑田
城门失火
重蹈覆辙
唇亡齿寒
从善如流
得陇望蜀
东施效颦
对牛弹琴
釜底抽薪
覆水难收
高山流水
狗尾续貂
邯郸学步
画虎类犬
画龙点睛
画蛇添足
鸡犬升天
狡兔三窟
金城汤池
锦囊妙计
近水楼台
举棋不定
刻舟求剑
困兽犹斗
滥竽充数
老马识途
老生常谈
乐不思蜀
梁上君子
两袖清风
鹿死谁手
洛阳纸贵
满城风雨
毛遂自荐
门庭若市
模棱两可
鸟尽弓藏
抛砖引玉
破釜沉舟
旗鼓相当
骑虎难下
歧路亡羊
杞人忧天
千万买邻
黔驴技穷
强弩之末
青云直上
请君入瓮
罄竹难书
人杰地灵
塞翁失马
三顾茅庐
三人成虎
死灰复燃
四面楚歌
守口如瓶
守株待兔
水滴石穿
水深火热
太公钓鱼
贪生怕死
螳臂当车
螳螂捕蝉
天罗地网
天衣无缝
铁杵成针
投鼠忌器
完璧归赵
玩物丧志
亡羊补牢
望梅止渴
危如累卵
味如鸡肋
未雨绸缪
卧薪尝胆
物以类聚
相煎太急
胸有成竹
悬梁刺股
掩耳盗铃
叶公好龙
一鸣惊人
一诺千金
一丘之貉
一叶障目
饮鸩止渴
游刃有余
愚公移山
鹬蚌相争
越俎代庖
自相矛盾
朝三暮四
纵虎归山
Sample Pages Preview
It is a pity that.more often than not, a wrong step cannot be retaken or changed for the better.In such cases, English speakers are likely to recall the saying, "It's no use crying over spilt milk," while most Clunese will cite the idiom Fu Shui Nan Shou.or"spilt water cannot be retrieved." 
Unlike other Chinese idioms, this popular four-character phrase has three different stories explaining its origin. 
Of the three, the most widely accepted is about a divorce case involving one of the most famous strategists in Chinese history who achieved success very late in his career. 
Jiang Taigong, who Iived during the late 11th century BC.martied a woman named Ma when he was a poor young scholar. 
Jiang cared little about material things and devoted almost all his time and energy to studying history and military strategies and tactics. 
After living in abject poverty with Jiang for several years, Ma got fed up with this "bookworm." who in her belief was not likely ever to become rich or famous.So she divorced him and left.
Chinese Idioms and Their Stories (Illustrated Version)
$11.00