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A History of Development of Tibet

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Author: Zheng Shan ;
Language: English
Format: Hardcover
Page: 508
Publication Date: 08/2010
ISBN: 9787119065380
Series: China Studies
Details
A History of Development of Tibet is a book of great academic value, as it traces the course of development of the Tibet Autonomous Region and gives an insight into the basic conditions in Tibet today.
With seven chapters, this book introduces the formation of the natural environment of Tibet, the origin of the Tibet ethnic group, the multi-ethnic development of Tibet, the close relations between Tibet and the Central Plains in Chinese history, the powerful influence of the culture of the Central Plains on Tibet's politics, economy, culture and religion, the formation of the various schools of Tibetan Buddhism and the unification of the government and religion in Tibet, the merging of Tibet into China in the Yuan Dynasty, the administration of Tibet under the Ming and Qing dynasties, and the Republic of China, the Tibetan people's heroic struggle against imperialism and feudalism, peaceful liberation and democratic reform, the realization of ethnic regional autonomy, and the building of socialism in Tibet. With a wealth of data, objective exposition, and many new ideas, this book will help readers have a good understanding of one of the China's most important autonomous regions.
Table of Contents
PREFACE Deng Fuquan and Yang Zaizhong
CHAPTER ONE ANCIENT SOCIETY OF TIBET
Section One Origin of the Tibetan People and the
Development of Tibet by Ancient Tibetans
1. The Rising of the Tibetan Land-Mass and the Formation of Its Natural Environment
2. Origin of the Tibetan Ethnic Group and the Distribution of Its Population
3. The Development of Tibet by Ancestors of Various Ethnic Groups
Section Two -Tibet Before the Establishment of the Tubo Regime
1. The Blending of the Qiang and Tibetan Tribes at the Turn of the Qin to Han Dynasties
2. Tibetan Tribes in the Period of the Wei, the Jin and the Southern and Northern Dynasties
3. The Rise of the Pugyal Tribe in the Yarlung Valley
4. The Rise and Fall of the Bon Religion, the Primitive Religion of Tibet

CHAPTER TWO THE TUBO DYNASTY OF THE TIBETAN SLAVE-OWNING SYSTEM
Section One The Establishment of the Tnbo Dynasty
1. Songtsen Gampo Unifies Tibet
2. Tubo Makes Rasa Its Capital
3. Economic Prosperity of the Tubo
Section Two Relations Between the Tubo and the Tang
1. Tang-Tubo Marriage Alliances and Princess Wencheng's Going to Tibet
2. The Expansion of the Tubo and the War Between the Tang and Tubo
3. Tang-Tubo Peace Pledge, Setting of the Boundary Line and Friendly Relations
Section Three The Decline of the Tubo Dynasty and the Rise of Buddhism in Tibet
1. The Fall of the Tubo Dynasty
2. Separatist Regimes in Tibet During the Song and Liao Dynasties
3. Formation of the Various Sects of Tibetan Buddhism

CHAPTER THREE THE MERGING OF TIBET INTO CHINA IN THE YUAN DYNASTY AND THE ESTABLISHMENT OF FEUDAL SERF SYSTEM
Section One The Yuan Government Merges Tibet into China
1. Tibet Gives Allegiance to the Mongolian Khanate
2. The Merging of Tibet into China
Section Two The Administration of Tibet by the Yuan Government
1. The Establishment of Xuanzheng-yuan
2. The Establishment of the System of Imperial Preceptor
3. The Administrative Divisions of Tibet
4. The Relationship Between the Sakya Local Regime and the Yuan Government
Section Three Feudal Serfdom of Tibet During the Yuan Period
I. The Establishment of the Feudal Serfdom
2. Economic Features of Tibetan Feudal Serfdom
3. Economic and Cultural Exchanges Between the Hans, Mongols and Tibetans During the Yuan Dynasty

CHAPTER FOUR THE TIBETAN AREAS IN THE MING AND EARLY QING DYNASTIES
Section One Ming Government's Administration of the Tibetan Areas
1. Establishment of an Administrative System over the Tibetan Areas in China by the Ming Government
2. The Tibetan Policy of the Ming Court
3. The Succession of the Tibetan Phagmodrupa (Desi) Local Regime
4. Apogee of the Tibetan Serf Economy and the Exchange of Tibetan Horses for Han Tea
Section Two The Reign and Administrative Reform of the Early Qing Dynasty in Tibet
1. The Establishment and Consolidation of the Qing's Rule over Tibet
2. The Gurkhas' Invasions and the Tibetans' Counterattack
3. Administrative Reforms Carried Out in Tibet by the Qing Government
4. Strengthening of Tibet's Border Defense
Section Three The Rise of the Gelug Sect in the Late Ming and Early Qing Dynasties
1. The Establishment of the Gelug Sect by Tsong khapa
2. The Establishment of the Dalai Lama Lineage and Confirmation by the Central Government
3. The Establishment of the Panchen Lama Lineage and Confirmation by the Central Government
4. The Influence Exerted by the Gelug Sect over Tibetan Society

CHAPTER FIVE TIBETAN PEOPLE STAND AGAINST WESTERN POWERS' INVASION
Section One The Invasion of Western Influences and the Opening of Tibet's Door
1. Western Powers' Invasion of the Countries South of the Himalayas
2. The First-Phase Invasion of Tibet by Western Powers
3. The Fatuous Qing Court and the Opening of the Gate of Tibet
4. Britain and Russia Contend over Tibet
Section Two The Tibetans' First Struggle Against the British Invasion
1. British-Indian Aggressive Forces Deliberately Cause Border Disputes
2. Tibetan Soldiers and Civilians Heroically Fight Back on Mount Lengtu
3. Two Unequal Treaties Signed
Section Three The Tibetans' Second Struggle Against the British Invasion
1. Tibet's Lax Border Defense and the British Scheme to Split Tibet
2. The Battle of Gyangze and the Fall of Lhasa
3. The Signing of the Treaty of Lhasa
Section Four New Qing Policies Toward the End of the Qing Dynasty and the Bankruptcy of the British Plot to Split Tibet
……
CHAPTER SIX TIBET UNDER SENI-COLOAIAL STATUS IN THE PERIOD OF THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA
CHAPTER SEVEN PEACEFUL LIBERATION AND BIRTH OF NEW TIBET
POSTSCRIPT
APPENDICES
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The 1911 Revolution ended the feudal system in China. The government of the Republic of China inherited the Qing's administrative structure in the Tibetan areas. It set up an administrative organ in charge of Mongolian and Tibetan affairs, selected Tibetan delegates to attend the national assembly and appointed its commissioners in charge of Tibetan affairs. Trying to obstruct this, the British government engineered the "Simla Conference" of 1913, seeking to interfere in China's internal affairs and force the so-called Simla Treaty on China, which severely violated China's sovereignty and was an attempt to split China's territory. This British conspiracy was opposed and condemned by all the Chinese people and their government. At the time of the May Fourth MOvement of 1919, the government of the Republic of China (ROC) disclosed to the public the Sino-British negotiation process relating the so-called Tibet problem. It aroused antiimperialist rage among the Chinese people both in China and abroad. Tibetan civil and religious leaders also condemned the British imperialists' attempt to split China at the Simla Conference. The government of the ROC from the very first day of its founding repeatedly declared to Tibet its policy on the republic of the five ethnic groups (Han-Chinese, Manchu, Mongolian, Hui and Tibetan), and at the same time the Tibetan local government time and again told the central government that it was willing to solve any problems left over by history. In 1919 the 13th Dalai Lama indicated to the envoys sent by the government of the ROC his support for the central government and his determination to make joint efforts for the happiness of the five ethnic groups. The Ninth Panchen Lama also actively contacted the central government and appealed for the restoration of normal relations between the central government and Tibet and the maintenance of the unification of the motherland.
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