FEEDBACK

Applied polymer materials

Price: $25.24 $17.74 (Save $7.50)
Add to Wishlist

Author: Wang Zhehui;
Language: English
Format: 26 x 18.5 x 1.4 cm
Page: 298
Publication Date: 08/2016
ISBN: 9787122265944
Table of Contents
Chapter 1  Fundamentals of Polymer Science / 1
1.1  Introduction  /  1
1.1.1  Writing Formulas for Polymeric Macromolecules  /  1
1.1.2  Properties of Macromolecules  /  3
1.1.3  Three Factors that Influence the Degree of Crystallinity  /  4
1.1.4  Regio and Stereo Isomerization in Macromolecules  /  6
1.2  Synthesis of Addition Polymers  /  7
1.2.1  Radical Chain-Growth Polymerization  /  8
1.2.2  Cationic Chain-Growth Polymerization  /  10
1.2.3  Anionic Chain-Growth Polymerization  /  10
1.2.4  Ziegler-Natta Catalytic Polymerization  /  11
1.3  Copolymers  /  12
1.3.1  Addition Copolymerization  /  12
1.3.2  Block Copolymerization  /  13
1.4  Condensation Polymers  /  13
1.4.1  Characteristics of Condensation Polymers  /  13
1.4.2  Thermosetting vs. Thermoplastic Polymers  /  16
1.5  Structure-Property Relationship  /  17
1.5.1  Linearity, Branching and Networking  /  17
1.5.2  Molar Cohesion, Polarity and Crystallinity  /  18
1.5.3  Role of Molecular Symmetry  /  18
1.5.4  Role of Chemical Modification in Effecting Internal Plasticization  /  19
1.5.5  Copolymerization and Internal Plasticization  /  19
1.5.6  Effect of Inclusion of Flexible Inter-unit Linkages and Rigid Bulky Groups  /  19
1.5.7  Effect of Temperature  /  21
1.5.8  Survey of Deformation Patterns in the Amorphous State  /  21
1.5.9  Transitions and Rubbery and Flow Regions  /  22
1.5.10  Property Demand and Polymer Applications  /  23
1.6  The Age of Plastics  /  25
1.7  The Law of Unintended Consequences  /  26
1.8  Recycling and Disposal  /  27
1.9  Biodegradable Polymers  /  29
Chapter 2  Plastics and Plasticizers / 33
2.1  Plasticizers: an Introduction  /  33
2.2  Early Plasticizers  /  34
2.3  Theory: Mechanism of Plasticizer Effect on the Polymer  /  34
2.4  Phthalate Plasticizers  /  35
2.5  The Phthalate Plasticizer Market  /  35
2.6  Health Issues in the Use of Phthalate Plasticizers: Are They Safe?  /  37
2.6.1  Evidence?  /  38
2.6.2  What's Being Done in the Meantime?  /  39
2.7  Health or Hype?  /  39
2.8  Plastics in Packaging  /  40
2.8.1  Introduction  /  40
2.8.2  Types of Plastics Used in Packaging  /  42
2.8.3  Plastic vs. the Alternatives  /  48
2.8.4  Reusing Plastic Packaging  /  49
2.8.5  Recycling Plastic Packaging  /  49
2.8.6  Conclusion  /  51
Chapter 3  Polymer Materials Used in Automobiles / 53
3.1  Introduction  /  53
3.2  Uses of Polymer Materials in an Automobile  /  53
3.2.1  Fuel Tank  /  53
3.2.2  Exterior  /  55
3.2.3  Interior  /  58
3.2.4  Polymers in Car Engine Manifolds and Power Trains  /  59
3.2.5  Conclusion  /  60
3.3  Car Tires  /  61
3.3.1  Introduction  /  61
3.3.2  Tire Production  /  62
3.3.3  The Chemistry of Tires  /  65
3.3.4  Brass Wire Adhesion  /  67
3.3.5  Disposal and Recycling of Used Tires  /  69
3.3.6  Tread Separation Problem Overview  /  69
3.3.7  Lawsuit Against Firestone and Ford Motor Co.  /  71
3.3.8  Conclusion  /  72
3.4  Kapton(r) Wiring  /  72
3.4.1  Introduction  /  72
3.4.2  Properties of Kapton(r)  /  74
3.4.3  Uses of Kapton(r)  /  74
3.4.4  Degradation of Kapton(r) and Other Polymers  /  76
3.4.5  Insulation Requirements for Wires  /  77
Chapter 4  Polymer Materials in Medicine / 79
4.1  Introduction  /  79
4.2  Polymer Materials in Medicine  /  80
4.2.1  A Brief History of Polymer Materials in Medicine  /  80
4.2.2  Cellophane  /  81
4.2.3  PGA, PLA, and PLGA  /  82
4.2.4  Polydimethyl Siloxane (PDMS)  /  83
4.2.5  Polyethylene and Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)  /  84
4.2.6  Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)  /  84
4.2.7  Polyurethane  /  85
4.2.8  Conclusion  /  86
4.3  Contact Lens Polymers  /  86
4.3.1  The History of Contact Lenses  /  87
4.3.2  How Contact Lenses Work  /  87
4.3.3  Why Do People Wear Contact Lenses  /  88
4.3.4  Biocompatibility and Contact Lens Comfort  /  89
4.3.5  Manufacturing of Contact Lenses  /  90
4.3.6  Hard Contact Lenses  /  91
4.3.7  Soft Contact Lenses  /  93
4.3.8  Problems Caused by Contact Lens Use  /  94
4.3.9  Conclusion  /  95
4.4  Silicone Implants  /  95
4.4.1  History  /  96
4.4.2  Silicone Implants  /  96
4.4.3  Advantages  /  97
4.4.4  Disadvantages  /  97
4.4.5  Concerns  /  99
4.4.6  Companies Involved in the Production of Silicone Breast Implants  /  100
4.5  Tablet Coating  /  100
4.5.1  Drug Release Paterns  /  101
4.5.2  Types of Coatings  /  103
4.5.3  Polymers Used for Film-Coatings (Film Formers)  /  104
4.5.4  Equipment  /  106
4.5.5  The Coating Process  /  109
4.5.6  Spray Variables  /  112
4.5.7  Formulation of Polymeric Coatings  /  116
Chapter 5  Polymer Processing / 120
5.1  Extrusion  /  120
5.2  Film Blowing  /  121
5.3  Sheet Thermoforming  /  122
5.3.1  Thin-gauge and Heavy-gauge (thick) Thermoforming  /  124
5.3.2  Engineering  /  124
5.4  Blow Molding  /  125
5.4.1  History of Blow Molding  /  126
5.4.2  Typologies of Blow Molding  /  126
5.5  Compression Molding  /  128
5.6  Transfer Molding  /  130
5.7  Injection Molding  /  131
5.7.1  Injection Molding Process  /  133
5.7.2  Methodology of Unit Process Life Cycle Inventory Model (UPLCI)  /  136
5.7.3  Injection Molding Process Energy Characteristics  /  136
5.7.4  Parameters Effecting the Energy Required for Brake Forming  /  137
5.7.5  Method of Quantification for Mass Loss  /  142
5.7.6  Manufacturers Reference Data  /  144
5.7.7  Problems Encountered in Injection Molding  /  145
5.7.8  Summary  /  145
5.8  Paints and Coatings  /  146
5.8.1  Paint  /  146
5.8.2  Clear Finishes  /  151
5.8.3  Other Coatings  /  152
5.8.4  Surface Cleaning  /  153
5.8.5  Superior Performance Aerospace coatings  /  155
5.9  Developments in Polymer Coatings for Dipped Goods  /  157
5.9.1  Key Requirements to Consider  /  159
5.9.2  Polymer Coating Choices  /  159
5.9.3  Manufacturing Considerations  /  161
5.9.4  Simple Tests of Coating Effectiveness  /  162
5.9.5  Latex Clothing  /  163
5.10  Choosing Polymers for Centrifuges  /  165
5.10.1  Life before Polymers  /  165
5.10.2  Types of Polymers  /  166
5.10.3  Jar Testing, Mixing Small Quantities of Polymers  /  169
5.10.4  Polymer Trials  /  177
Chapter 6  Nanotechnology In Polymer Materials / 181
6.1  A Unit of Length: A Nanometer--the Millionth Part of A Millimeter  /  181
6.1.1  Small Particles, Large Surface Areas  /  182
6.1.2  Does Nano Equal New?  /  183
6.1.3  Move into the Nano Era  /  184
6.1.4  Nanotechnology at an Overview  /  185
6.1.5  Value-adding Chain of Nanomaterials  /  186
6.1.6  The Research Verbund  /  186
6.1.7  Nanoparticles Offer Protection from the Sun  /  187
6.1.8  Ideas for Innovation from New Business Areas  /  188
6.1.9  Multidisciplinary Nature of Nanotechnology  /  188
6.2  Nanoparticles in Megatons: Wide-Ranging Applications for Polymer Dispersions  /  189
6.2.1  Large Production Volume for Aqueous Polymer Dispersions  /  190
6.2.2  Water-like Viscosity Despite High Solids Content  /  190
6.2.3  Four Ways of Creating Diversity  /  191
6.2.4  The Goal: High Solids Content and Good Processability  /  192
6.2.5  Multiphase Polymers  /  193
6.2.6  Nanocomposites with Different Morphologies  /  194
6.2.7  Major Advance: Dispersions Containing Butadiene  /  195
6.2.8  New Catalysts for Tactic Polymers  /  196
6.2.9  Virtually Limitless Range of Applications  /  197
6.3  The "Eyes and Fingers" of Nanotechnology: Analysis Leads the Way to the Nanocosm  /  198
6.3.1  Atomic Force Microscopy: Uphill and Downhill in the Nanoworld  /  199
6.3.2  Nanoinstrumentation: Tweezers, Heaters and Pipettes  /  199
6.3.3  Computer Simulations are Often Helpful  /  201
6.3.4  BASF Has Its Own Ways to Analyze Nanoparticles  /  202
6.3.5  Particle Collider Data  /  202
6.3.6  A Special Variation on TEM: Heavy Atoms in the Spotlight  /  204
6.3.7  Light, Raman Scattering and Fluorescence  /  206
6.3.8  Nanoanalysis: at the Forefront of Chemical Nanotechnology  /  208
6.4  Nanostructures through Self-Organization: Color without Dyes, Taking a Lead from Nature  /  208
6.4.1  The Three-dimensional Photonic Crystal  /  210
6.4.2  Matrix of Polymer Material  /  210
6.4.3  Crystallites of Polystyrene Particles under a Scanning Laser Microscope  /  213
6.4.4  Using Particle Size to Achieve the Entire Range of Colors  /  213
6.4.5  The One-dimensional Photonic Crystal  /  214
6.5  Nanostructures through Self-organization: Rubber Laser with Variable Optical Properties  /  215
6.6  Nanostructures with the Lotus Effect: Building Blocks for Superhydrophobic Coatings  /  219
6.6.1  Dual Structure Fights Dirt  /  220
6.6.2  Water Droplets Have Nothing to Hold on to  /  221
6.6.3  Lotus Spray in the Pipeline  /  222
6.6.4  Much Research Needs to Be Done  /  224
6.7  Nanotubes: Small Tubes with Great Potential  /  224
6.7.1  Introduction  /  224
6.7.2  Synthesis and Purification of SWCNTs  /  226
6.7.3  Structural and Physical Properties  /  226
6.7.4  Defect-group Chemistry  /  228
6.7.5  Covalent Sidewall Functionalization  /  228
6.7.6  Noncovalent Exohedral Functionalization  /  230
6.7.7  Endohedral Functionalization  /  231
6.8  Sinking One's Teeth into Nanotechnology: Hydroxyapatite and Tooth Repair  /  231
6.8.1  Big Market for Dental Care Products  /  232
6.8.2  Fundamental Technology Shift in Dental Care  /  233
6.8.3  Nanoparticles with a Huge Surface Area  /  234
6.8.4  Extensive Know-how in the Bottom-up Process  /  234
6.8.5  Self-organization in Film Formation  /  235
6.8.6  On the Road to Marketability  /  236
6.9  Nanocubes as Hydrogen Storage Units: The "Battery of Tomorrow" for Laptops and Cell Phones  /  236
6.9.1  Hydrogen Instead of Methanol  /  237
6.9.2  The Next Big Idea: Metal-Organic Frameworks  /  238
6.9.3  Encouraging Storage Results  /  239
6.9.4  The Advantage of Physisorption  /  240
6.9.5  Energy Densities Compared  /  241
6.9.6  Great Prospects for Specific Applications  /  242
6.9.7  Helpful Know-how from Catalyst Production  /  243
6.10  Nanoscale Tree Molecules: Dendrimers for New Printing Systems and Car Paints  /  243
6.10.1  Protecting Group Techniques for Tree growth  /  244
6.10.2  Polymer Building Blocks  /  245
6.10.3  Hyperbranched Polymers Give New "Tree Species"  /  247
6.10.4  Synthesis Control by Reactive Groups  /  248
6.10.5  Making Their Mark on Plastic  /  249
6.10.6  Automotive Coatings: Scratch-resistant yet Flexible  /  250
6.10.7  Parquet Floors: Keep Your Stilettos on  /  251
6.11  Economic Perspectives of Nanotechnology: Enormous Markets for Tiny Particles  /  252
6.11.1  Nanotechnology as Enabling Technology  /  252
6.11.2  Market Expectations: Euphoria or Reality?  /  254
6.11.3  Extreme Differences Between Market Estimates  /  254
6.11.4  Nanoparticles: Large Surface-to-Volume Ratio  /  255
6.11.5  High Consumption in Electronics and Information Technology  /  256
6.11.6  Major Growth Expected from Start-ups  /  257
6.11.7  Nanocomposites: Innovative Fillers for Plastics  /  257
6.11.8  Nanocoatings: Big Business in Germany  /  259
6.11.9  Conclusion and Outlook: the Bottom Line  /  260
6.12  From University Research to the Chemical Industry: How Much Hype Is There in Nanotechnology?  /  260
6.12.1  Nanosciences at the Universities and in Research Networks  /  262
6.12.2  An Intermezzo: How Much Hype is There in Nanotechnology?  /  265
6.12.3  Which Areas of Nanotechnology will be Successful in the Short and Medium Term?  /  266
6.13  A Great Future for Tiny Particles  /  272
6.13.1  Nanotechnology also Has a Major Impact on BASF's Traditional Business Areas  /  272
6.13.2  Opening up New Markets with Nanotechnology  /  273
6.13.3  Nanotechnology Means Learning from Nature  /  273
6.13.4  Open to New Impulses for Innovations through Cooperative Ventures  /  274

Appendix 1  Nanoanalytical Methods at BASF (excerpt) / 276
Appendix 2  Nanoanalysis at BASF (excerpt) / 277
Appendix 3  Glossary of Basic Terms in Polymer Science / 278
Appendix 4  Conversation Tables / 295
Applied polymer materials
$17.74