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Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan

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Author: Ji Junxiang; Wang Guozhen;
Language: English
Format: 21 x 13 x 2 cm
Page: 164
Publication Date: 03/2017
ISBN: 9787508530482
Publisher: China Intercontinental Press
Series: Chinese Classics Stories
Details
Zhao the Orphan is a Chinese play of the Yuan Dynasty, attributed to Ji Junxiang, written in the second half of the 13th century. In it the hero sacrifices his son to save the life of young Zhao so that Zhao can later avenge the death of his family. It is the first Chinese play known in Europe.

This book is edited and translated by the famous translator Wang Guozhen, to introduce Zhao the Orphan to the foreign readers.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Child Duke Holds Human Life like a Straw
Chapter 2
Plot to Kill Zhao Zun
Chapter 3
Zhao Dun’s Family Slaughtered
Chapter 4
Cheng Ying Saves a Child
Chapter 5
Plan to Save Zhao the Orphan
Chapter 6
Gongsun Chujiu Dies for Zhao the Orphan
Chapter 7
Zhao the Orphan Brought up in the Tiger’s Lair
Chapter 8
Revenge Made
Sample Pages Preview

《赵氏孤儿故事》由著名翻译家王国振在原著基础上进行编译,向国外读者讲述赵氏孤儿故事。
This book is edited and translated by the famous translator Wang Guozhen, to introduce Zhao the Orphan to the foreign readers.



Sample pages of Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan (ISBN:9787508530482)
Sample pages of Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan (ISBN:9787508530482)
Sample pages of Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan (ISBN:9787508530482)
Sample pages of Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan (ISBN:9787508530482)
Sample pages of Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan (ISBN:9787508530482)


During the Warring States Period, Duke Ling of the State of Jin came to the throne as a child. When Duke Ling attained manhood, he plundered the people mercilessly and held human life in complete disregard. Zhao Dun was the son of Zhao Shuai, who had accompanied Duke Wen, the previous ruler of Jin, on his 19-year exile. Duke Ling treated him with a mixture of hatred, respect and fear. Tu’an Gu, had the ear of Duke Ling at this time. Tu’an Gu came from a military family. Having practiced martial arts from an early age, he had come to the notice of Duke Ling, who appointed him head of the palace guard. Tu’an Gu was as cunning as a fox and an accomplished flatterer, as well as being adept at reading a person’s thoughts. He soon had the ordinary court officials eating out of his hand, and as for Duke Ling, manipulating him was child’s play for Tu’an Gu. The duke, in turn, doted on his chief bodyguard, who never left his side whenever he went out on jaunts. If perchance, Tu’an Gu happened to be absent on any occasion, Duke Ling was as distressed as if he had lost his right arm. Early perceiving that Duke Ling cared for nothing but satisfying his appetites, Tu’an Gu used all his guile and flattery to wheedle out of the duke what he most desired. Then he had a park constructed in the eastern part of the royal palace in Jiangyi City, the capital of Jin. Crystal-clear streams and shady paths meandered around lofty halls, terraces and pavilions. Rare and exotic plants were brought from all over Jin and planted in the park, so that fine trees were in bloom all the year round, and lush lawns breathed their fragrance. Of all the flowers that bloomed in their turn, those of the peach trees were the most numerous.
Chinese Classics: Zhao the Orphan
$15.72