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A Concise History of Chinese Economic Thought

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Author: Hu Jichuang;
Language: English
Format: Hardcover
Page: 592
Publication Date: 08/2009
ISBN: 9787119057552
Details
The book's illuminating facts and profound analysis reveal the noteworthy achievements in ancient China'seconomic thought, giving it its due in the history of world economic thought.
About the Author
Hu Jichuang(1903—1993)was born into an educated family in 1903 at Shiyang town,Tianquan Count);Sichuan Province.He was mainly involved in teaching and iournalism in Chengdu before he left for England in 1935, where he obtained a master's degree in economics at the School of Political Economics of London University at the end of 1938.
After 1949 Hu Jichuang became head of the Department of International Trade in Hangzhou's Zhejiang University,then principal of the Institute of Finance of Zhejiang University, principal of Zhejiang Institute of Finance,and polltical economic professor in Shanghai Institute of Finance and Jiangxi University.
After 1955,with more material and time available to him,Hu Jichuang began compiling a book on China's economic thought.In early 1960 the volumes of A History of China's Economic Thought came out,followed in 1981 by the this volume,completing a valuable set of books on the three.thousand year history of China's economic thought.The book has been highly appreciated by scholars since its publication.
The year 1981 also saw the publication of A Concise History of China's Economic Thought,an abridged edition of the original work.The book has been used as teaching material in some institutions of higher learning,having been certified in June 1982 by the Ministry of Education as an official textbook.He has also compiled An Outline History of Modern Chinese Economic Thought.
Table of Contents
PREFACE
PART ONE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE PRE-QIN PERIOD BEFORE THE FOUNDING OF THE QIN DYNASTY
IN 221 B.C.

CHAPTER ONE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE WESTERN
ZHOU DYNASTY (1066-771 B.C.)
Section Ⅰ Wealth
Section Ⅱ Agricultural Production
Section Ⅲ Handicrafts and Trade
Section Ⅳ Markets
Section Ⅴ Prices and Usury
Section Ⅵ Fiscal Policy
Supplementary Note- The Fiscal Viewpoint of "The Tribute System of Yu"

CHAPTER TWO ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF SOME STATESMEN
OF THE SPRING AND AUTUMN PERIOD
Section Ⅰ Guan Zhong on the Social Division of Occupations
Section Ⅱ San Oi's Balance Theory of Money
Section Ⅲ Fan Li on Commerce and Trade Cycles

CHAPTER THREE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF CONFUCIUS AND
HIS SCHOOL
Section Ⅰ Confucius and His Immediate Followers
(1) Wealth
(2) Production and Commerce
(3) Distribution and Consumption
(4) State Finances
(5) General Survey of Confucius' Economic Thought
(6) Economic Thought in Great Learning and Doctrine ot the Mean
(7) The Ideal of Great Harmony
Section Ⅱ Economic Thought of Meng Ke (Mencius)
(1) Fundamental Attitude Towards Wealth
(2) Permanent Property
(3) Labour
(4) Price and Forestalling
(5) Finance
(6) Ideal of ling Land System
(7) Summary

CHAPTER FOUR ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF MO DI AND HIS SCHOOL
Section Ⅰ Mutual Benefits
Section Ⅱ Value and Price
Section Ⅲ Labour
Section Ⅳ State and Class
Section Ⅴ Population
Section Ⅵ Finance
Section Ⅶ Consumption
Section Ⅷ Short Summary

CHAPTER FIVE ECONOMIC THOUGHT IN GUAN ZI
Section Ⅰ Economic Interpretation of Social Ethics
Section Ⅱ Wealth and Labour
Section Ⅲ Self-interest
Section Ⅳ Distribution
Section Ⅴ The Prodigality Theory of Contmmption
Section Ⅵ The "Light-Heavy" Theory
(1) The Origin and Aim of the "Light-Heavy" Theory
(2) Rules of the "Light-Heavy" Doctrino
(3) General Application of the "Light-Heavy" Doctrine
Section Ⅶ Theory of Money
Section Ⅷ Price and Commerce
Section Ⅸ Public Finance
Section Ⅹ Other Economic Policies
Section Ⅺ General Summary

CHAPTER SIX XUN KUANG AND HIS CONCEPT OF WANTS
Section Ⅰ Human Wants
Section Ⅱ Production of Wealth
Section Ⅲ Distribution of Wealth
Section Ⅳ Other Economic Thought

CHAPTER SEVEN ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE LEGALIST SCHOOL
Section Ⅰ Li Kui's Teaching "On the Best Use of the Productivity of Land
Section Ⅱ Shang Yang's Policy of Farming and War
(1) Shang Yang's Economic Ideas in General
(2) Policy of Farming and War
Section Ⅲ Economic Thought of Han Fei
Section Ⅳ Summary

CHAPTER EIGHT ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF TAOISTS, AGRICULTURALISTS AND OTHERS IN THE WARRING STATES PERIOD
Section Ⅰ Economic Thought of the Taoist School
Section Ⅱ Economic Ideas of the Agriculturalist School
Section Ⅲ The Commercial Thought of Bai Gui

PART TWO ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE EARLIER PERIOD OF THE FEUDAL LANDLORD ECONOMY D FROM THE SECOND CENTURY B.C. TO THE NINTH CENTURY A.D.
CHAPTER NINE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF SECOND CENTURY B.C. THINKERS AND SIMA QIAN
Section Ⅰ Economic Thought of the Second Century B.C.
Section Ⅱ Economic Thought of Sima Qian

CHAPTER TEN ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF SANG HONGYANG AND THE POLEMICS AT THE SALT AND IRON CONFERENCEIN 81 B.C.
Section Ⅰ Stress on Commerce
Section Ⅱ General Economic Concepts
Section Ⅲ Important Economic Measures
Section Ⅳ Economic Thought of the Adversaries of Sang Hongyang

CHAPTER ELEVEN AGRICULTURAL ACHIEVEMENTS AND MONETARY IDEAS FROM THE MID-SECOND CENTURY TO THE FIRST CENTURY B.C.
Section Ⅰ Agricultural Achievements in the First Century B.C.
Section Ⅱ Geng Shouchang's System of Granaries for Grain-Price Stabilization
Section Ⅲ Two Views Regarding Money

CHAPTER TWELVE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF WANG MANG AND OTHER THINKERS IN THE EASTERN HAN DYNASTY(A.D. 25-220)
Section Ⅰ Economic Policies of Wang Mang
Section Ⅱ Economic Ideas of Wang Fu
Section Ⅲ Economic Thought of Revolutionary Peasants During
the Latter Half of the Second Century
Section Ⅳ Xu Gan's Essay on Population

CHAPTER THIRTEEN ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE JIN DYNASTY (265-420)
Section Ⅰ Fu Xuan (217-278) on Public Finance
Section Ⅱ Idea of Land Occupancy in the Western Jin Dynasty
Section Ⅲ Lu Bao's Essay "On the Money God

CHAPTER FOURTEEN ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE SOUTHERN AND NORTHERN DYNASTIES——FROM THE FIFTH TO THE SIXTH CENTURY
Section Ⅰ Concept of Free Coinage and the Monetary Thought of Kong Ti
Section Ⅱ Li Anshi's Idea of Land Equalization and the Land Equalization System of the Northern Wei Dynasty
Section Ⅲ Jia Sixie and His Important Arts tot the People's Welfare

CHAPTER FIFTEEN ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE TANG
DYNASTY w FROM THE SEVENTH TO THE NINTH CENTURY
Section Ⅰ Some Special Economic Institutions in the Tang Dynasty
Section Ⅱ Monetary Concepts
Section Ⅲ Theories of Public Finance

PART THREE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE LATER
PERIOD OF FEUDAL LANDLORD ECONOMY AND THE
PERIOD OF SEMIFEUDAL, SEMICOLONIAL ECONOMY From the Eleventh Century to the May Fourth Movement, 1919

CHAPTER SIXTEEN ECONOMIC REFORM OF WANG ANSHI IN THE ELEVENTH CENTURY
Section Ⅰ Wang Anshi's Economic Reforms
Section Ⅱ General Review of the Economic Thought of Wang Anshi

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN MONETARY THOUGHT OF SHEN KUO
AND OTHER THINKERS IN THE NORTHERN SONG DYNASTY(960-1127)
Section Ⅰ Su Xun's Criticism of the Ideal of the ling Land System
Section Ⅱ Monetary Theory of Shen Kuo——the Velocity of Cir-

Culation
Section Ⅲ Monetary Ideas of Zhou Xingji
Supplement to Section Ⅰll On the Origin of the Paper Money Jiao Zi
Section Ⅳ Commercial Ideas of Su Shi

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN UTILITARIANS' ECONOMIC VIEWS AND THE MONETARY THEORY OF THE SOUTHERN SONG DYNASTY (I 127-1279)
Section Ⅰ The Utilitarians' Economic Views
Section Ⅱ Paper Money and Monetary Theory of the Southern Song Dynasty
Section Ⅲ Lin Xun's Programme for the Restoration of the ling Land System
Section Ⅳ Dons Wei's Policy of Famine Relief

CHAPTER NINETEEN THE PAPER-CURRENCY ORDINANCE OF 1287 AND THE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE YUAN DYNASTY (1271-1368)
Section Ⅰ Ye Li and the Paper-Currency Ordinance of 1287
Appendix to Section Ⅰ Text of the Paper-Currency Ordinance of 1287
Section Ⅱ Economic Policy of Lu Shirong
Section Ⅲ Other Fourteenth-Century Economic Thought

CHAPTER TWENTY ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE MING
DYNASTY mFROM THE FIFTEENTH TO THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
Section Ⅰ Economic Thought of Qiu Jun
Section Ⅱ Antitraditional Economic Thought in the Sixteenth Century
Section Ⅲ Other Economic Ideas

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE ECONOMIC THOUGHT DURING THE
LATE MING AND EARLY QING DYNASTIES uFROM THE
SEVENTEENTH TO THE BEGINNING OF TIlE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
Section Ⅰ Economic Slogans of the Revolutionary Peasants in the
Early Forties of the Seventeenth Century
Section Ⅱ Xu Guangqi's Principles of Agricultural Administration
Section Ⅲ Economic Thought of Wang Fuzhi
Section Ⅳ Economic Thought of the School of Yah Li and Wang
Yuan

CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO HONG LIANGII'S THEORY OF POPU LATION, WE! YUAN'S CALL FOR "LEARNING FROM THE WEST" AND OTHER ECONOMIC THOUGHT m FROM THE
EIGHTEENTH TO THE MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY
Section Ⅰ Lan Dingyuan on Overseas Trade
Section Ⅱ Hong Liangji, the So-called Chinese Malthus
Section Ⅲ The Monetary Controversy in the 1930s and 1940s and
Wang Maoyin's Idea of Convertible Paper Money
Section Ⅳ Wei Yuan, Initiator of the Great Transition in the History of Chinese Economic Thought

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE ECONOMIC THOUGHT OF THE PE-
RIOD OF SEMIFEUDAL, SEMICOLONIAL ECONOMY
From the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the May Fourth Movement of 1919
Section Ⅰ General Survey of the Trend of Economic Thought Since1840
Section Ⅱ Economic Thought of the Taiping Heavenly Kngdom
Section Ⅲ Disseminators of Western Economy After the Sixties
Section Ⅳ Disseminators of Bourgeois Political Economy, Ma lianzhong and Yah Fu
Section Ⅴ Economic Thought in the First Two Decades of the
Twentieth Century
EPILOGUE
Chinese Dynasties
Bibliography
Chinese Names of Personages Mentioned
Sample Pages Preview
Regulations for the regular market in the capital were ratherstrict.The market was held three times a day.Morning marketstarted at dawn and consisted mostly of transactions among the merchants themselves.The grand market took place at noon, principal-ly for the benefit of the common consumers.At the evening fair,peddlers were the chief sellers.All day, anyone who went to orfrom the market had to pass through a designated front gate, whereofficials, each with a bamboo whip in hand, kept a watchful eyeon passers-by.Market stalls were assigned definite places and therows of stalls or the goods in a given stall must always be kept ingood order.Every transaction had to be carried out in accordancewith the officially regulated procedures and at officially regulatedprices.Anyone who violated the regulations would be disciplinedor punished by the market officials, sometimes right on the spot.For any goods to be carried into or out of the market, a sealedcertificate issued by the Chief Controller of the Market had to beshown.
The spaces or stalls where the goods were displayed for salewere generally arranged according to price levels, so that expensivegoods were displayed separately from cheap goods, even if theywere of the same category.This practice prevented buyers of dif-ferent social classes from mixing.
The commodities allowed on the market were also kept withincertain strict limits.The royal marketing orders clearly specifiedthe kinds of goods for sale and the conditions under which theymight be sold.Other goods were strictly prohibited from the market.Forbidden commodities included, first of all, jadeware specially madefor use at court, formal robes and court carriages of the titled nobil-ity.Utensils customarily used in the ancestral temple of the royalfamily and for sacrifices could also not be bought or sold.Thefinal category of forbidden commodities was military weapons.
A Concise History of Chinese Economic Thought
$40.00