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The China Tea Book

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Author: Luo Jialin;
Language: English
Page: 209
Publication Date: 09/2012
ISBN: 9787515309606
Table of Contents
PART Ⅰ TEA 
CHAPTER 1 
Overview 
CHAPTER Ⅱ 
Green Tea 
Dragon Well 
Green Spiral 
Mount Meng Sweet Dew 
Bamboo Leaves Green 
CHAPTER Ⅲ 
Oolong Tea 
Wuyi Rock Tea 
Iron Mercy Goddess 
Frozen-summit Oolong 
White Tip Oolong 
CHAPTER Ⅳ 
Black Tea 
Keemum and Dian Hong 
Lapsang Souchong 
CHAPTER Ⅴ 
Pu-erh Tea 
PART Ⅱ 
TEA CULTURE 
CHAPTER Ⅵ 
Principles 
Time 
Space 
Existence 
Ambiance 
CHAPTER Ⅶ 
Ancient Chinese 
Tea Culture 
Poetry 
Calligraphy 
Painting 
CHAPTER Ⅷ 
Tea and Zen 
CHAPTER Ⅳ 
Dissemination 
Japanese Tea Ceremony 
Anciont Toa Route 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Sample Pages Preview


Sample pages of The China Tea Book (ISBN:9787515309606) 

Sample pages of The China Tea Book (ISBN:9787515309606) 

choose the right tea variety and concept development method. This process canalso operate the other way around. Sometimes, we have to refer to the distinctiveproperties of a certain tea variety to decide on the design concept and select propercomponents for the tea setting. In the selection phase, we have to differentiatebetween function and decoration. Actually, there is never a distinct boundary betweenthe two. For example, even when selecting tea-brewing utensils, we have to considerthe form, color and material of the teaware to make the tea setting pleasing to the eye.We can break down components of the tea setting into different categories, based onwhether they are associated with the visual, audio, tactile, olfactory, and gustatoryexperience, whether it is solid or liquid, whether it has life, whether it is consumptive,as well as its texture, color and form. For example, tea cups may be solid porcelainvessels with pheasant motifs involving the utilization of under-glaze and over-glazetechniques, feeling smooth to the touch. Tea snacks may be lotus-shaped, light bluishin color, made of glutinous rice, sticky and sweet. Flowers may be added to match theoverall ambiance. Of course, this is a rigid example, but it provides a certain approachto understand tea settings. 
To understand tea settings in this way might give birth to a false assumptionthat a tea setting consists of various elements on different levels. Actually, whateverelements are included in a certain tea setting is solely based on the designer's personalchoice. Sometimes, we might adopt a minimal approach and thus choose onlyfunctional elements. If a tea gathering is designed to share Pu-erh tea that has beenstored for decades, perhaps a male tea ceremony performer may wear a plain gowngreyish in color, without decoration; the table covered with greyish coarse table cloth;teaware of deep grey pottery or Yixing clay teapots featuring simplistic styles; on thewall hangs a calligraphy scroll in clerical script reading "the greatest aroma is aromaless"; the setting involves no use of flowers, incense or zither, or other adornments.In the tea gathering process, attendees are to refrain from chatting. In this seeminglysomber gathering, attendees can concentrate on the Pu-erh without distraction. Infact, this unadorned tea setting is defined by a unique charm. The color palette, theperformer's gown, tablecloth, teaware, tea liquor and scroll create a subtle rhythm.The use of grey tones weakens the visual impact, with no sound save the rubbing offabrics, the shifting of teaware, and the flowing of tea. In this way, the aroma and tasteof the tea become the dominant factor, lingering in the tea drinkers' mind.
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The China Tea Book
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